Dear Cleo 17 09 24

Dear Cleo

How are you darling, having had two days off whilst I thought about things, I am totally astonished about how fast ideas can travel on the internet, and this is a perfect example of just how bad the photograph compares with a painting.

https://www.facebook.com/VanGoghMuseum/photos/pcb.10159372764640597/10159372764165597/?type=3&theater

While the Van Gogh museum  were using their best marketing  brains to come up with that, without thinking the whole idea through, I was busy reading a book. I am one of those old people who believe that books trumps (I am unsure if that word is politically correct these days, maybe it is OK if you use a small t) the internet. I was reading Ms Petherbridge’s excellent book The Primacy of Drawing within which, she quotes Monsieur Merleau Ponty’s statement “he who sees cannot possess the visible unless he is possessed by it”. (Petherbridge p. 279)

I believe I am fighting a losing battle as Microsoft Word recognises neither Merleau nor Ponty. Maybe a part of Amsterdam is bereft of Dutch translations of either of these books. I think Microsoft Word only recognises Petherbridge because I keep banging on about it.

I am not being intellectual here because, whilst I have a copy of the good Monsieur’s book, I have yet to read it, preferring instead to read books with pictures in them. Maybe if I read more books without pictures I wouldn’t need to go on the internet at all.

It could be that this is the parable of the tourist, unless you abandon your mobile phone and sit down  and wait, and give things time, to interact with you, will never possess anything except an airline ticket and a kiss me quick hat.

I am sorry, my darling, for being so grumpy but I have just spent three hours on the M6, followed by three hours on the M1, coming home to a hungry cat and Amsterdam’s finest conclusions. Despair over, I will find the new horse as I sleep.

All my love, as always

Mickos xx

P.S. note for the Harvard educated amongst my readers,

Petherbridge D. (2014)The Primacy of Drawing, New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

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