Dear Cleo 18 09 17

Dear Cleo

I trust you are still enjoying your summer holiday. It was great to watch Coco with you at the weekend, It was a really good film, and yes I will buy the popcorn next time. I am coming to the end of this part of the course and this is probably the last entry.

Parallel Project Assignment piece

I have done around twenty projects on this course of study so far and I know that a project is not complete without an assignment piece. So I thought long and hard about a suitable assignment piece to complete the Parallel Project.

I had treated the assessment process as an exhibition and had provided a hard copy catalogue to accompany it, but I was concerned that the catalogue is read either before or after an exhibition, and only the pieces in the exhibition make a true impact. If I could make a work that encompassed the whole parallel project, that would be quite something.

I thought long and hard about it and remembered my investigations into Cornelia Parker who used everyday objects in her work similarly to the way Duchamp did but with a subtle twist.

One of the reasons that Cornelia Parker came to mind is that she carried out a collaborative work with her seven year old daughter entitled “World on the edge of tricky small print”. The whole of the Parallel project is based on collaboration and the art of children, which has featured in both the Parallel Project and the Critical review and where is most children’s art displayed? On the fridge Door. There probably isn’t a fridge door in the world that doesn’t record the travels or artistic endeavours of the offspring of its owners.

A fridge door proved problematical due to the practical need for it to be posted so I constructed a facsimile Fridge door that could easier fit in the post.

Collage operates by sticking things to a ground, a fridge door operates as an art object by sticking things to it with magnets. There isn’t a name for this but I think aimantage is suitably French sounding to express the technique. Google has just pointed out that magnage isn’t even a word, I corrected her but I had better start with a definition.

Oxford English Dictionary

Aimantage: noun proper; a term describing a work of art created using an artistic technique invented by Mickos in the early twenty first century. It is essentially the use of magnets to produce an image on a flat metallic surface using elements of collage. The intention was that whilst the component pieces of the work remain constant they may be rearranged at will to suit the sensibilities of the viewer.

Wikipedia

Almost every home in the world has an aimantage, it is a work of art constructed on a metallic surface such as a fridge door with the use of magnets. It is tactile and moveable by the viewer to suit his or her aesthetic sensibilities.

The first Aimantage was created by Mickos in 2018 and was entitled “Collaborations with my inner Child”

Figure 1 Collaborations with my Inner Child, Aimantage 60 x 90 cm on sheet steel

 

The beauty of the work is that it is easily rearranged to suit the sensibilities of the viewer with an infinite number of combinations almost like a Rubik cube.

It is a very tactile piece somewhere between sculpture and painting that allows the full engagement of the viewer in completing the work of art, rearranging it as seems necessary within the constraints given by the artist.

I have made some assembly instructions (Using drawing as instruction, probably the only form of drawing still missing from the coursework) so that the piece can be reassembled in accordance with my original intentions but I would be interested to receive photographs of any alternative arrangements proposed by viewer’s interventions.

Have a good time at Granny C’s and we will catch up when you get back.

My love as always,

Mickos xx

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